FIND RESEARCH FUNDING

*How Do I Find Funding Opportunities?*

Many people tell me they are unable to find grant opportunities relevant to their fields. Sometimes, they don’t realize that because of the economic and competitive realities of the research environment, they may have to realign their research interests to coincide with available funding opportunities (more about this in future posts).

Of course, one way to locate funding opportunities is to simply ask colleagues for advice. Interestingly, people sometimes do not take advantage of the resources available next door or down the hall. Another way to locate funding opportunities is to investigate your colleagues and competitors. Who supplies their funding? A third way to locate funding opportunities is to determine what grants a particular agency has funded in the past—focus on the funding agency and search for “grants funded.” Such information is usually available on the website, although it may take some effort to find it.

The NIH Reporter provides vast amounts of information on NIH funded grants, including researcher and organization, text search, project details, and other filters. Likewise, the NSF offers Award Search with simple search and advanced search capabilities that include awardee information, program information, and other information such as keyword search functionality. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation maintains a Grant Archive that is searchable by keyword or grant number, status (active vs. closed), date awarded, and geographical location. From evaluating the grants funded in the past, it is often easy to ascertain if your research strategy could be seriously considered for funding by any given agency.

Many times, people have told me they are simply unfamiliar with the easiest places to search for funding opportunities or it just seems to be too hard to do a thorough search. If you are really stumped, take advantage of services offered by your research development office—people there should be able to give you new ideas about funding sources.

Below, I have listed some of the most recognizable funding search sources and a few specific funding opportunities. More information on funding topics will be forthcoming in subsequent blog posts.

To Locate Traditional Funding Opportunities

Free resources available on the Web to locate potential traditional funding opportunities:

Paid resources available on the Web to locate potential traditional funding opportunities: your institution may have subscriptions.

  • PIVOT (formerly Community of Science)

Pre-doctoral Students

National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program

National Science Foundation SBE Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants

National Institutes of Health, Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards for Individual Postdoctoral Fellowships to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research (F31)

US Department of Agriculture, Food and Agricultural Sciences National Needs Graduate and Postgraduate Fellowship (NNF) Grants Program

Cornell Fellowships Database

UCLA Graduate & Postdoctoral Extramural Support Database (GRAPES)

Postdoctoral Associates / Fellows

National Institutes of Health, Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards for Individual Postdoctoral Fellowships to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research (F32)

Pathway to Independence Award (Parent K99/R00)

NSF Specialized Information for Postdoctoral Fellows

Cornell Fellowships Database

Michigan State University Graduate Fellowships Database

UC, Berkeley: Postdoctoral funding in the social sciences

UC, Berkeley: Postdoctoral funding in the humanities

UCLA Graduate & Postdoctoral Extramural Support Database (GRAPES)